Need Dinner in a Hurry? There's a Drone for That.

August 15, 2019

These days, technology is so advanced and evolves so quickly that it can be hard to keep track of the latest developments. Drones are a perfect example - they’re becoming more and more accessible and universally employed. Consequently, regulations are changing at a rapid pace. Check out the latest in drone developments here.

    • Drones might soon be delivering your next Amazon order. Well, okay, maybe not that quickly. But it’s in the works. Since 2016, Amazon has been working to develop a Prime Air drone delivery service. With Prime Air, packages would get to customers within 30 minutes of placing an order. Amazon has recently taken steps to come in closer compliance with the FAA’s drone flight regulations - check out their recent petition with the FAA here.
    • Drones delivering Big Macs? It’s true. Uber has recently begun testing food delivery via drone in San Diego. If all goes well, they’ll conduct a larger launch in 2021. Other major companies, including Google, have also gotten in the mix. Super convenient or super scary? You decide.
    • Drone delivery is being tested in the humanitarian context too. For example, earlier this year, UPS announced a partnership with Matternet, to deliver medical samples throughout North Carolina as part of an initiative by the state to expand healthcare to its residents. Johns Hopkins has also begun testing the delivery of blood samples via drone. And late last year, a drone was used to deliver a vaccine for the first time ever. If utilized on a global scale, drone technology has the potential to impact the healthcare industry dramatically.

These developments are only the tip of the iceberg. Look out for other industries to soon be impacted by drone technology. In the meantime, for a foundational overview, be sure to check out this program to learn all about FAA Regulation of Drones. Our brand-new Aviation Law Curriculum will also provide you with all the latest updates on all things air-related: buying a private jet, trends in aviation litigation, and how to avoid falling for the old “Flight Department Company Trap.”

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Author Bio

Written by Angelica Cesario

Angelica Cesario is Lawline's Lead Program Attorney. She graduated cum laude from Amherst College in 2008 and holds a B.A. in Women's and Gender Studies and a Certificate in Latino and Latin American Studies. She received her J.D. from Columbia Law School in 2013 and is admitted to practice law in New York and New Jersey. Before joining Lawline, Angelica worked as a plaintiff-side labor & employment litigation attorney. Outside of work, Angelica serves on the Board of Directors of the TEAK Fellowship, a non-profit academic and cultural enrichment program that provides educational access to top NYC students. Angelica is the proud mom of an energetic toddler. During her free time, she enjoys reading, trying new foods, and catching up on her favorite TV shows.

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